Robert Strayer

Rob Strayer serves as the Executive Vice President of Policy at the Information Technology Industry Council (ITI). He leads ITI’s efforts to shape technology policy around the world to enable innovation, competition, and economic growth, while supporting governments efforts to achieve their public policy objectives. Managing a team of experienced professionals at ITI, he is responsible for developing and executing policy strategies in major global markets and on a wide range of digital technology issues, including privacy and data protection, cybersecurity, trade and market access, taxation, artificial intelligence, and standards.

Prior to joining ITI, Strayer served as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Cyber and International Communications Policy at the U.S. State Department. In that role, he led dozens of bilateral and multilateral dialogues with foreign governments on digital economy regulatory, cybersecurity, and technology supply chain security issues. He was named as an ambassador by the President to lead the 90-plus person U.S. delegation to the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Plenipotentiary Conference in Dubai, United Arab Emirates in 2018.

Before joining the State Department, Strayer was the general counsel for the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee. He also practiced telecommunications law at WilmerHale, and clerked for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit.

Strayer received a law degree from Vanderbilt University Law School, and earned his B.A. in Economics, summa cum laude, from Denison University.

Assessing the Patent and Trademark Office’s Inventorship Guidance for AI-Assisted Inventions

By Alexander Kersten As new applications of artificial intelligence (AI) become more sophisticated, AI tools are increasingly used to assist in the process of invention. However, given that inventorship is limited to natural persons under U.S. law, AI’s growing utilization has raised questions around whether AI-assisted inventions should receive patents,
Read More

Securing IP and the Future of Pandemic Preparedness

By Jeffrey Depp In December 2021, member states of the World Health Organization (WHO) at a Special Session of the World Health Assembly created an intergovernmental negotiating body (INB) to draft and negotiate a WHO convention, agreement, or other international instrument on pandemic prevention, preparedness, and response (“Pandemic Agreement”). The
Read More

The Use of March-In Rights Could Undermine Innovation and National Security

By Hideki Tomoshige and Sujai Shivakumar By accelerating new products to market, the nation’s innovation system—a network of interconnected activities across university researchers, small and large businesses, and venture capital and other financial organizations, among other actors—enhances economic growth, competitiveness, and national security. Securing the future of this innovation system
Read More