Daniel H. Rosen

Daniel H. Rosen is a Founding Partner of Rhodium Group and leads the firm’s work on China, India, and Asia. Mr. Rosen has twenty-nine years of professional experience analyzing China’s economy, commercial sector, and external interactions. He is widely recognized for his contributions on the US-China economic relationship. He is affiliated with a number of American think tanks focused on international economics and is an Adjunct Associate Professor at Columbia University. From 2000-2001, Mr. Rosen was Senior Adviser for International Economic Policy at the White House National Economic Council and National Security Council. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and board member of the National Committee on US-China Relations. A native of New York City, Dan graduated with distinction from the graduate School of Foreign Service of Georgetown University (MSFS) and with honors in Asian Studies and Economics from the University of Texas, Austin (BA).

When AI Helps Generate Inventions, Who Is the Inventor?

By Andrei Iancu and Rama Elluru This commentary from the CSIS-SCSP Task Force on IP in the AI Era was originally published in the Special Competitive Studies Project’s Substack on February 15, 2024. With roots in the U.S. constitution, patent rights provide an exclusive property right in new inventions like drugs,
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Standard Essential Patents and European Economic Security

By Kirti Gupta and Chris Borges On April 27, 2023, the European Commission published a draft proposal on standard essential patents (SEPs) seeking to address the perceived lack of transparency and predictability in the licensing of SEPs. The commission proposes the creation of a competence center within the European Union Intellectual
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Proposed Federal Use of March-in Rights Would Weaken American Innovation

By Sujai Shivakumar and Thomas Howell   The Biden administration is considering exercising something called “march-in rights” as a policy prescription to curb drug prices. But as with any prescription, there is a need to weigh efficacy against the side-effects. In this case, there is evidence that the vast majority of
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