Jacques Crémer

Jacques Crémer received his PhD from MIT in 1977 and has held appointments at the University of Pennsylvania and Virginia Tech University. Since 1991 he has been Professor at the Toulouse School of Economics, where he has held many administrative appointments, most recently being the first director of its Digital Centre. He is a Fellow of the Econometric Society and of the European Economic Association. He has done fundamental work on planning theory, auctions, incentive theory, organization economics, and more recently the digital economy. From April 2018 to March 2019, he was a Special Adviser to European Commissioner for Competition Margrethe Vestager, and in that capacity co-authored the report “Competition Policy for the Digital Era”. He is an active participant in the debates on the regulation of “Big Tech”.

Assessing the Patent and Trademark Office’s Inventorship Guidance for AI-Assisted Inventions

By Alexander Kersten As new applications of artificial intelligence (AI) become more sophisticated, AI tools are increasingly used to assist in the process of invention. However, given that inventorship is limited to natural persons under U.S. law, AI’s growing utilization has raised questions around whether AI-assisted inventions should receive patents,
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Securing IP and the Future of Pandemic Preparedness

By Jeffrey Depp In December 2021, member states of the World Health Organization (WHO) at a Special Session of the World Health Assembly created an intergovernmental negotiating body (INB) to draft and negotiate a WHO convention, agreement, or other international instrument on pandemic prevention, preparedness, and response (“Pandemic Agreement”). The
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The Use of March-In Rights Could Undermine Innovation and National Security

By Hideki Tomoshige and Sujai Shivakumar By accelerating new products to market, the nation’s innovation system—a network of interconnected activities across university researchers, small and large businesses, and venture capital and other financial organizations, among other actors—enhances economic growth, competitiveness, and national security. Securing the future of this innovation system
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