Rama Elluru

Rama G. Elluru is currently a Senior Director at the Special Competitive Studies Project (SCSP), a non-profit, funded by Eric and Wendy Schmidt and established to make recommendations to strengthen America’s long-term competitiveness for a future where artificial intelligence (AI) and other emerging technologies reshape our national security, economy, and society.  Previous to the SCSP, she was a Director at the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence (NSCAI), an independent Commission established by Congress to consider the methods and means to advance the development of AI, ML, and associated technologies to address the national security and defense needs of the United States.  She was detailed to the NSCAI from the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), where she served as an Administrative Patent Judge on the Patent Trial and Appeal.  Before joining the USPTO, Rama practiced IP law for 20 years, particularly in analyzing and litigating E.E. and bio-pharma patents. She graduated from Trinity University with a B.S. in Computer Science/Philosophy and obtained a J.D. from the Washington and Lee School of Law. After law school, she received a M.S. in Biochemistry/Molecular Biology from Georgetown University.

Little Evidence Supporting the Argument About Limiting the Patent Holder’s Right to Select the Licensing Level

Gregor Langus & Vilen Lipatov In our new paper ‘Efficient level of SEPs licensing’, we examine the question whether a patent holder should be allowed to choose the level in the value chain at which to offer to license its standard essential patents (SEPs). SEPs are patents
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On the Timing of ETSI Disclosures Summary

The question of timing when companies disclose their patents as being essential to practice industry standards, such as 4G and 5G, has been recently discussed in several high-profile legal disputes. Some implementers have argued that disclosures made after the “Freeze Date”— the date when new features are no longer added
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Inventing Ideas: Patents, Prizes, and the Knowledge Economy

B. Zorina Khan’s seminal work, Inventing Ideas: Patents, Prizes, and the Knowledge Economy, dissects the innovation policies of key industrial nations during the First and Second Industrial Revolutions — periods of historic levels of invention and creativity. The author seeks to provide insights for determining the
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